Last One… Honest

Last cycling piece for a while. I think this might be my favourite out of all these pieces. The composition works really well and the colour application has a screen-print aesthetic that I think compliments the piece. I was in two minds whether to fully render Mont Saint-Michel, but after a couple of tests I decided it was wiser to just stick to the line work and use the cloud as a way of giving the architecture some form. Its my hope that your eye is drawn to the white areas, specifically the cyclist first because of the small amount of black and white that comprise the character. This is because your eye is naturally drawn to negative space, sometimes known as the 80/20 rule. If you imagine a sheet of white paper with about 20 percent of the page covered by black, you will find your eye seeking out all the black areas. The same principle is being applied here with the black and white on yellow.

Cheers

Matt

Tour De France

This is more of a prep piece than anything because I’ve got a commission on for a Tour de France poster. I wanted to experiment with giving the work a more traditionally painted look by adding texture and inconsistencies in the application of lines and paint. If I’m honest I’m really happy with how this turned out. The narrow use of colour is always something I try to stick to these days because it makes the composition more harmonious. The bold colours and and limited value (tone) range are also a focus now and tend to be indicative of my current style. The typography is my own making, but is heavily based around the Art Deco aesthetic.

Cheers

Matt

I am Speed

There is a place where I live that has an old sandstone wall that skirts the estate of a golf course and hotel. The hotel, an 18th century Georgian manor, was home to a man named Charles Waterton who was a famous naturalist and is reputed to have inspired Charles Darwin’s endeavours. Waterton explored the farthest reaches of the globe and had a keen interest in the natural world, collecting samples and even allegedly riding a Camen. When he returned home he built the wall as a way to protect and observe the local wildlife and thus created what is thought to be the worlds first nature reserve. The illustration above is inspired by the many cyclists that ride the estates outskirts, and is a scene I see frequently when I go running. Enjoy!